Project

MAYA @ LIKAS by Kenneth Tan

project_01_Maya_birdeye-H03.jpg

Maya meets the need for the increase of family residents in the vicinity of Likas. Likas is an education, sports and elderly care hub containing several primary and secondary schools, elderly centres and a sports complex. This multi-use project had in mind convenience and a conducive environment for family interaction and connectedness.

project_01 Maya logo-06.png

Maya sits atop a trapezium shaped piece of land. Despite this unconventional scheme of property, Maya is able to offer three blocks of 520 residential units with 16 design layouts in a range of sizes, starting from 860 to 1300 s.f. Facilities include a 25m lap pool, a kids pool, half basketball court, gym, multi-purpose hall, Play House cabanas surrounded by landscaped lawns, BBQ areas, courtyard garden, kids playground, a Light House lounge and treadmill area, the Tree House deck and a jogging track.

project_04-maya_playhouse.jpg
project_02-Maya_Entrance-H03.jpg

The public spaces in Maya are designed to create ease of both visual and physical accessibility. Sitting at the Pool Area, one is able to see through to the multi-purpose hall, gym and all the way to the main entrance. Besides the lounge chair deck, residents will find shade and relaxation in the brightly-coloured tepees. The aluminium tepees has a little cutout at the back for cooling and a fun exit for the children. A raised deck, called the Treehouse, is made with a webbed wall to accommodate climbing creepers and residents seeking an elevated vantage point to rest and view the Pool.

 
 
 
project_05-Maya_sky-lounge-H02.jpg
 
 

An appreciation of greenery is reflected throughout the grounds. A jogging track surrounds the property, placed atop major drains. Little nooks of spaces between utility equipment and shrubs and trees are put to good use for outdoor gym equipment. The sub-basement parking lot utilizes daylight and ceiling cutouts for energy use and conservation.

project_07-maya_jogging.jpg
project_03_Maya-treehouse.jpg
 
 

A feature facility is the Lighthouse, situated in between two towers on the 15th floor. It contains a cardio room and a glass-walled lounge. The Lighthouse is tropically inspired with bamboo-like rods propped to create private reading spaces. Open windows and large fans generate a cool and naturally ventilated interior.

project_06-maya_treehouse-top.jpg
 
 
 
 

DETAILS

maya-facilities-plan.jpg

MATERIAL

 

SUSTAINABILITY

Instead of an underground parking, the carpark is placed sub-basement. Light and air pours in through open walls during the day. Vertical voids between the towers were afforded to allow air flow and light to permeate the buildings.

Instead of an underground parking, the carpark is placed sub-basement. Light and air pours in through open walls during the day. Vertical voids between the towers were afforded to allow air flow and light to permeate the buildings.

The walls of the Function Hall contain large windows and louvers for natural ventilation. Each window frames a different “moment” of the outdoors, although they are each one of a whole.

The walls of the Function Hall contain large windows and louvers for natural ventilation. Each window frames a different “moment” of the outdoors, although they are each one of a whole.

Openings in the glass wall of the Light House brings in breeze into the room and reduces the need for air conditioning. Inside, a series of breathable bamboo like vertical structure also allow the air to flow freely in the space. Casement windows protect the interior from rain.

Openings in the glass wall of the Light House brings in breeze into the room and reduces the need for air conditioning. Inside, a series of breathable bamboo like vertical structure also allow the air to flow freely in the space. Casement windows protect the interior from rain.

Screens made up of louvered bars guide ventilation into the space. The diagonal orientation of the bars allows wind to flow in fluidly.

Screens made up of louvered bars guide ventilation into the space. The diagonal orientation of the bars allows wind to flow in fluidly.

To draw in more natural light and reduce the use of electricity, skylights are exploited where possible. Light flows into the sub-basement carpark through cutouts on the ceiling.

To draw in more natural light and reduce the use of electricity, skylights are exploited where possible. Light flows into the sub-basement carpark through cutouts on the ceiling.

Walking through the Spine, a series of Green Walls are found to create a subtle tunnel-like effect. This is created by nylon spider webs attached to planter boxes. Tropical vegetation climbs up the nylon support and acts as a natural air filtration system. The planter boxes also collect rainwater and prevents heavy rain from splashing into the corridor.

Walking through the Spine, a series of Green Walls are found to create a subtle tunnel-like effect. This is created by nylon spider webs attached to planter boxes. Tropical vegetation climbs up the nylon support and acts as a natural air filtration system. The planter boxes also collect rainwater and prevents heavy rain from splashing into the corridor.

A gym deck was designed to resemble a nest, a place to meditate, rest and hide away. Nylon cables allow for climbing plants to create a green cover. This green walls shelters the space from direct sunlight..

A gym deck was designed to resemble a nest, a place to meditate, rest and hide away. Nylon cables allow for climbing plants to create a green cover. This green walls shelters the space from direct sunlight..


project-fact-sheet-maya.jpg

TREE CUBE by Kenneth Tan

TREE-CUBE-7-Courtyard-main.jpg
Project-Page_Treecube_logo.jpg
 

A redundant courtyard garden in the centre of one of Sabah Tshung Tshin Secondary School’s brick-clad building was avoided due to insufficient shading and the presence of mosquitoes. It is on this site that the Tree Cube was conceived. The three section structure contains student and teacher lounges, a waiting area, staff rooms, boardrooms and a performance amphitheatre.

TREE-CUBE-1-Overall-View-1.jpg

The Tree Cube is, in part, a monument to the trees that were removed from the site to construct the building. In light of this, the Tree Cube is dressed in diagonally oriented aluminium bars painted black, silver and gold. These resemble the branches of tree and cast branch-like shadows on the floor into the building as well as filter day light.

A void between the existing building and the Tree Cube drives natural ventilation on the ground floor, reducing the need for mechanical cooling. Furthermore, the middle section is cut out, leaving a vent for passive airflow. This middle Courtyard is where the Amphitheatre is found. Inlaid with black marble, this is where students have presentations and discussions.

TREE-CUBE-Design-Element-3.jpg
20180228_153600.jpg

The ground floor is fitted with concrete S-shaped benches to encourage interaction. Surfaces for books and bags are accommodated by custom-made metal mesh tables. Bricks and pebble ground renders an earthy and cool atmosphere to the space, much like the environment under the shade of a tree.

Furnishing the edges of the students waiting area are planter boxes with foliage in them alongside pebble-faced concrete seats and metal mesh side tables. A trellis covers the opening above to allow diffused light, ventilation and rain to cool the area.

social-hub-NFP02025.jpg

At the end of the waiting area, a Trophies Wall hides a fun surprise.

A Social Hub, splashed in bright colors and quirky wall cartoons caters to meeting, counselling and presentation rooms. A modern pantry completes this section as the ultimate teacher/parent/student meeting area.

social-hub-NFP01989.jpg
social-hub-NFP01987.jpg

The first floor houses staff rooms with air-conditioning. However, lounge and pantry areas conserve energy by using open windows, and bookshelves as heat buffers. The second floor comprises the executive and administrative offices, and two meeting rooms.

board-room-NFP01910.jpg

DETAILS

TC_Detail_Concept-2.jpg

Facade

Before construction could begin, a group of trees had to be removed. In memory of these fallen , inspiration was drawn from the values of a tree. “十年树木,百年树人”means “It takes ten years to grow trees but a hundred years to bring up a generation of able men.” A tree is not just a plant. It provides shelter from the elements, it creates shade and shadows for coolness, and for many, the canopy of a tree facilitates socializing and study. The tree, therefore and more so, is a facilitator of learning and expander of talent.

 
TC_Detail_Concept-3.jpg

Form

The name "Tree Cube" became a design homonym. “Tree Cube” sounds almost exactly like "Three Cube". The structure is literally drawn up of three "cubes", each with it's own function. The middle structure contains a large square void that passively drives air flow throughout the building.

 
TC_Detail_Diagram-Process1.jpg

Spatial planning used 3 cubes which resulted from a central cube being sandwiched between two working space cubes. The middle cube circulates air throughout the building

A tree trunk cut-out in the centre of the middle cube produced a small courtyard. This also created a concentric space which became the centre of activity for this design

A series of screens are added at the courtyard and onto the frontal facade of the building. The screens cast a tree-like shadow into the space and also act as a sun shading device for the offices space

 
TC_Detail_Diagram-Process2a.jpg
TC_Detail_Diagram-Process2b.jpg
TC_Detail_Diagram-Process2c.jpg

Creating Spaces For Interaction

A pleasant space for social and educational gatherings improve a school's general health and well-being. The Tree Cube building contains several places that makes interaction convenient and easy to pursue. A space for every possible discourse has been thought of, whether it be for private counselling sessions, teaching classes, parent-teacher meetings, group discussions or just hanging out.

TC_Ground-Floor-Plan.jpg
TC_First-Floor-Plan.jpg
TC_Second-Floor-Plan.jpg

MATERIAL

Appearance & Finish

This building is given a stylish and modern finish with it's bold black, gold and silver swipes on aluminium bars. This brazen style is subdued by earthy internal colors of brick and yellow earth.

With it's assembly of glass and aluminium, the Tree Cube pays homage to it's surrounding by reflecting the school's outdoor environment. Diagonal aluminium bars display the elementary arrangement of branches of a tree.

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_01.jpg

Bricks

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_02.jpg

Earthy, ground-cover colours of brick and pebbles drape the floor and seats of the Social Hall.

 

Aluminium Bars

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_03.jpg

Aluminium bars are arranged into diagonal louvers that replicate the branches of a tree and diffuse light into the building. These bars create branch shadows on walls and floors.

 

Glass and Steels

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_04.jpg

Glass and steel bars frame the exterior and make for a modern finish to corridors and social areas.

 

Wiremesh

The diffusing and flowy choice of material continues in the metal wiremesh sidetables used at side benches.

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_05.jpg
 

Drain Cells

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_06.jpg

Drain cells are used for lamp shades. At night, all these mesh shades light up and create leaf-like shadows on the floor and walls.

 

Pine Wood

Tree-Cube-MATERIAL_07.jpg

The pleasent and light appearance of pine wood rendered it suitable cladding for bookshelves and for movable sliding doors and swivel walls.


SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainable Energy Passive Design

Tree-Cube-Sustainable_01.jpg

As you walk into the Social Hall of the Treecube, the one noticeable difference from the outside is the temperature drop. The air is cool, almost chilled, and there is no air-conditioning or fan on. During the day, there is also no need for electrical lights. This management of energy reduces utility costs and provides a comfortable environment. This pleasant condition is made possible by several intentional designs. The separation between the old and new building acts as an air passageway allowing hot air to escape. A large opening in the centre of the building drives airflow, and allows more light in. To enhance this heat vacuum, the walls on the central opening are painted black, pulling warmth faster and more effectively. The relatively narrow entrances from the old building's structure also guides breeze into the inner space.

 

Passive Air Flow & Natural Lighting Design

Tree-Cube-Sustainable_02.jpg

The void in the central courtyard draws hot air out of the building while allowing cool air to enter. Mechanical cooling on the ground floor and first floor balcony is not needed. At the same time sunlight streams in to illuminate spaces and tickle the aluminium shades into making fun shadows on the floor.

 

Sustainable Energy Design

Tree-Cube-Sustainable_03.jpg

White walls protectively insulate the structure from heat exerted from the existing building's aircon compressors. Staircases are lit during the day by vertical spaces connected to a skylight, saving electric energy and providing natural lighting.


project-fact-sheet-treecube.jpg

CITY LOUNGE BY B&R by Kenneth Tan

project_BNR_featPic2.jpg
Project-Page_BNR_logo.jpg

B&R stands for Baggage & Rest, but this multiple-use retail lot was created to offer so much more. Primarily a transit lounge and luggage storage for travellers killing time off the Kota Kinabalu International Airport (just 6 km away), B&R is also a café, bar and meeting venue. Whether one agrees or not is a matter of perspective, but B&R may also be the place where you’ll find the fancies of an interior designer let loose.

_NFP0103.jpg
_NFP0054.jpg
main_BNR_IMG_20190418_162605.jpg
IMG_20190418_165433.jpg

The profusion of art and color found in this place could only be because of a very personal and vested interest for this project. From the local Borneon mural paintings on the walls to the selection of bluish turquoise retro tiles in the bathroom and the polished gold finish of the bar shelves, everything calls for attention and appraisal. There is a whimsical nostalgia especially in the Colonial Room, furnished to resemble the interiors of the 1900s British North Borneo Railway’s steam engine trains. Even the shower stalls are interactive; pulley baskets stow away belongings instead of the typical wall rack and hooks.

Couches, beverage bars, bean bags and a pool table furnish spaces for total relaxation and self-reflection. The bean bags are set within “cages”; vertical poles arranged to enclose a space within a space. Personal work stations are offered to give patrons privacy and conducive work areas. Meeting rooms set in colourful animated artwork is used for groups of people in need of office, discussion or presentation rooms.

 
_NFP0002.jpg
_NFP0010.jpg
_NFP9995.jpg
_NFP0078.jpg
_NFP0060.jpg
_NFP0095.jpg

project-fact-sheet-bnr.jpg

GARDENS @ BUNDUSAN by Kenneth Tan

project_Gardens_20170526_103942.jpg
 
Gardens-LOGO.jpg

An unwavering belief in the healing power of nature conceived a tropical utopia in the middle of an arid commercial township. From the gate entrance to the last pillar, the Gardens intends to engulf itself in vegetation.

The-Garden_H-entrance-05.jpg
20170526_110721.jpg
 
 

Such lushness is achieved by the integration of several nylon string walls sided by planter boxes throughout the public areas of this 29-floors condominium. These nylon “curtains” facilitate the upward growth of climbing and creeping plants, and provides shade and light diffusion.

_NFP0404.jpg
_NFP0349.jpg

A spacious elevated garden deck of more than 1 acre is the central oasis here. The 50-metre pool, gym, canopied cabanas, and a BBQ dining area is surrounded by palm and bamboo trees, manicured lawns, zen-inspired gardens and a trellis walkthrough. Such a generous amount of lushness and spaciousness only reflects the abundance of Kota Kinabalu’s natural environment.

2 layouts are offered to prospective residents – Type A measuring 982 sq ft and Type B at 848 sq ft. Both give 3 rooms and 2 baths. Full sized windows give a heightened sense of space, and open dining and living areas allow for flexible adjustments according to the resident’s tastes and flair.

_NFP0354.jpg

project-fact-sheet-gardens.jpg

ALILA DALIT BAY SABAH by Kenneth Tan

Artist’s Impression. All copyright reserved to Alila Dalit Bay Sabah.

Project-Page_Alila logo.jpg

An ongoing project with the Alila Group for their tropical rainforest lifestyle experience hotels and villas. Structures are enclosed by the beach and extensive gardens, forests and water features. The hotel will offer 152 bedrooms/suites while the private ownership villas are limited to just 74.

Hotel
 
Alila-Hotel-aerialB.jpg
Alila_24.jpg
 

Studies include design influences from the Borneon native longhouse which brings in materials such as local woods, woven rattans, painted screens and tribal artefacts. Integration of the rainforest environment into the final design of this work is essential in achieving Alila’s quintessence of blending luxury into the beautiful locale of their properties.

Alila_villa2-swimming-pool-flatten-dof-lo-A.jpg
Alila_villa1_living-flatten-dof1.jpg
Alila_villa1-washroom-A.jpg

project-fact-sheet-alila.jpg

RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR by Kenneth Tan

Main_FOB_LivingR.jpg
 
Project-Page_FOB_logo.jpg

The assignment required a simply yet classy layout for a soon-to-be married daughter; a wedding gift from a father. The open concept layout provided a sense of spaciousness and a casual ambience.

Tables, cabinets and counter tops are set in earthy and woody tones which render the space relaxed and calm. Splashes of yellow and red in cushions and pillows are mellowed by grey couches and carpet. The final touches; dried flowers in glassware gives a sense of agelessness and elegance.

_DSC7944.jpg
 
DSC_1019_s.jpg
_DSC7997.jpg
_DSC8152.jpg
 
IMG_7102.jpg

ELEMENTS @ LIKAS by Kenneth Tan

Element-Likas_01.jpg
elements-logo.jpg

Project Brief

Client

Project Status

Land Size

Location

Submitting Architect

Proposed 783 Units, 2 Blocks of 29-Storey Condo and 1 Block of 5 Storey Commercial/Office Building with 4-storey Car Park

Wilakaya Sdn. Bhd

Preliminary Design

10.2 Acres

Jalan Fung Ye Ting, District of Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

Ronnie Ang Architect

A modern high rise condominium set within an established city fringe area. Designed with a curated environment of lush landscape, pathways and tropical gardens including a 1.5 acre private park, the tower blocks rise up 33 storeys with stunning panoramic views of the iconic Mount Kinabalu and the South China Sea.

project_element-pool.jpg
 
element_st01.jpg
element_fp06.jpg
element_IMG_9122.jpg
 
element_fp07.jpg

ARCH KIOSK by Kenneth Tan

main-archkiosk_20171007_113529.jpg
Project-Page_archKIOSK_logo.jpg

A fun project for the Team, the Archkiosk was a submission for a competition organized by City Hall. The requirement was simply to create and produce a kiosk motivated by green design.

We decided to reverse the relationship between manmade vs nature made elements by having purely industrial materials and re-purposed building products to help set the stage for live plants to be displayed. Archkiosk is made up of several blocks of steel rebars frames covered in re-purposed plastic drain cells and (industrial packing) PVC strips. The shapes can be rearranged and the Archkiosk becomes a convertible picnic table with seats and bicycle stand!

05-presentation-slide_installation-day-06.jpg
archkiosk_20171007_094138(0).jpg
06-presentation-slide_installation-day-07.jpg

Further enhancing the message of the Archkiosk as a people/nature friendly product, Team KTDA collaborated with the Free Tree Society, who “take seeds, sprout them, look after the seedlings, then give away healthy plants to the public for free on environmental holidays.” The Archkiosk was a display stand for tropical plants on the day of the City Hall exhibition, and at the end of the day, all plants on display had been given to visitors to bring home to grow in their own garden.

PVC strips were woven together after the authentic pattern of Sabah’s native “anyaman” to make the covering. The material and method of uniting them was found to produce an attractive texture as well as a sturdy surface that could be used both for tables and seating.

Although not recognized as a winner, quality was found not only in this outdoor furniture product, but also in the united and jolly efforts of the Team.

20171007_112054.jpg
07a-20171004_181813.jpg
17-220171003_160210.jpg